Sui Generis

July 24, 2007

Pagan Prayer Beads

Filed under: Book of Shadows,Goddess,Pagan,Spirituality,witchcraft — by Joyful Girl @ 10:13 pm

 Written by Cauldron Living staff writer Eevie Keys

A set of Pagan Prayer Beads is similar to a Rosary (indeed, in some
circles they are known as the Witch’s Rosary). This project is perfect for
customization. I will give you a set pattern. Feel free to follow or
create your own! Likewise, I will give you set prayers for each bead, but I
will also include variations. As always, your spiritual practices are as
unique as you are. Take what suits you from the following guidelines, but
please make this your OWN set of Prayer Beads.

Creating Your Own Witch’s Rosary

My set of Prayer Beads was created to remind me of the forest. I knew
that I wanted to have nine sets (3 x 3, number of the Divine Mother) of
three beads for the Maiden, Mother and Crone and eight single beads in
between the Goddess sets for Earth prayers.
I purchased thin leather cord; a set of green, dark green and amber
beads; a set of varying sized wooden beads and small silver beads for
spacers.
When stringing the beads, I kept this pattern in mind:

Three spacers
Earth bead (soft green bead)
Three spacers
Amber bead
Dark green bead
Small wooden bead
Large wooden bead
Small Wooden Bead
Dark green bead
Amber bead
Three spacers
Earth Bead, etc.

Some variations might include a simple large bead in place of the Goddess
sets of three, or, even simpler, alternating different color beads. When
you think of a pattern you like, write it down before you begin. It always
helps to have a simple chart to work with to start.
Depending on which deities you invoke, the colors will change. For example,
if you worship Brigid, your set of Prayer Beads would probably be made up of
red, gold and white. If you worship Diana, you would use blue and silver.
But please don’t get carried away with “traditional” color meanings! The
colors themselves have deeper magical meanings, so choose your colors with
intuition and heart.
Once you have your pattern and beads chosen, string the beads onto the cord.
As you place each bead onto the cord, say something that binds it to you.
A good chant to keep up the rhythm of the stringing is, “Goddess come and
bless this art, merry meet and merry part.”
Once the pattern and desired number of beads is strung, it’s time to knot
the cord. Bring both loose ends together and tie a knot, double-knot it and
triple-knot it, saying the chant firmly and with conviction for the final
three times. Your set of Prayer Beads is ready to be consecrated!

Consecrating your Beads!

A simple consecration ritual to dedicate this magical tool involves a white
candle, sandalwood incense and no interruptions! Sit comfortably with the
candle in front of you — the incense should be close but not distractingly
so. Place the string of beads open in a circle before you and set the
candle in the center of the circle. Notice what a perfect circle it forms.
It never ends. It is the spiral, it is the sphere…it is part of the Goddess
just as you are. Take some deep breaths and place your hands over the
beads. State your intention, words full of heart:

“Woven in an endless sphere,
These beads become a string of prayers,
Full of hope and dreams to be,
Goddess bless and please hear me.”

Prayers for your Beads

Now individual prayers need to be assigned to the beads. They can be
as simple as a “Thank you” to a full-fledged recitation of the Charge of the
Goddess. My advice? Keep it simple. If it’s too complicated and involves
too much pageantry, it might not remain a daily practice, no matter how
firmly you wish to include it.
For ideas, look at the many beautiful Pagan songs and chants that have
been created over the years. Take lines or couplets (two lines) from these
songs to create your prayers — or write your own!
To get you started, here are the prayers I use on my set of forest
beads.

Spacer beads:
“For She says: All acts of love and pleasure are my ritual.”

Earth bead (soft green bead):
“The Earth is our mother, we must take care of her —
Her sacred ground we walk upon with every breath we take.”

Amber bead:
“Ancient Mother, I hear you calling,
Ancient Mother, I hear your song.”

Dark green bead:
“We all come from the Goddess, and to her we shall return
Like a drop of rain, flowing to the ocean.”

Small wooden bead (MAIDEN):
“Maiden, sister, lover, friend,
I am grateful without end
For all.”

Large wooden bead (MOTHER):
“Mother mine, I have been blessed —
I thank you for all of this.”

Small wooden bead (CRONE):
“Crone, wise one and dearest sage,
I thank you for all that I have
Or will.”

Further Ideas

If you absolutely do not have enough time to devote to this in a day,
here’s an idea that I’ve used in a pinch that has certainly helped me!
Create a small set of prayer beads — a string that’s only long enough
to be a bracelet. Use a pattern and the appropriate beads, but make it in
miniature. Once tied, it certainly looks like a bracelet and could be used
for such. Consecrate and dedicate it as you normally would and wear it to
work or school. There are precious free moments in every day, even if it is
among a large group of people. Fingering the beads and saying your prayers
silently does just as much good as in your own home or behind closed doors.

July 17, 2007

I am a High Priestess; Armenian Water Sports, Living Goddess Knocked From Her Pedestal

Filed under: Goddess,News and Culture,Pagan,Spirituality,tarot,witchcraft — by Joyful Girl @ 2:59 am

You are The High Priestess

Science, Wisdom, Knowledge, Education.

The High Priestess is the card of knowledge, instinctual, supernatural, secret knowledge. She holds scrolls of arcane information that she might, or might not reveal to you. The moon crown on her head as well as the crescent by her foot indicates her willingness to illuminate what you otherwise might not see, reveal the secrets you need to know. The High Priestess is also associated with the moon however and can also indicate change or fluxuation, particularily when it comes to your moods.

What Tarot Card are You?
Take the Test to Find Out.

 

Water “holiday” in Armenia mixes Pagan and Christian traditions, cultures.

Nepalese “living goddess” gets the pink slip for travelling to U.S.

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